From The East

Brethren

The month of March has been declared by the Grand Master as Youth Orders Month. We celebrate the youth of our Fraternity and their contributions not only to our Fraternity and our appendant bodies, but to our local communities, as well. Being that they are the future of our Society, it is important that we support what they are doing to positively motivate them and encourage them in all of their endeavors. During this month, for our Family Dinner, our Youth Orders will be helping with service and proceeds will be going to their individual chapters to assist in furthering their cause.

Speaking of which, the Family Dinner will be our famous, delicious Corned Beef and Cabbage Dinner (yes, St. Patrick’s Day is fast approaching!!). Come with an appetite, since the food will be yummy!

We are [tentatively] planning a third degree for the end of the month, (more information to follow!), with more on the way!

One final note: I will be attending the CDA Cares event at the Solano County Fairgrounds on March 9 (it is also happening on the 8th, as well, but since that is a Friday and I will most likely be working that day…). From the website cdacares.org:

“An estimated 10 million Californians experience barriers to dental care. The California Dental
Association and CDA Foundation host CDA Cares, a program that allows volunteer dentists, with
the assistance of other dental professionals and community volunteers, to provide dental services at no charge to an average of 1,950 people at each event.”

This is a life changing experience for all who attend and I hope that (someday) this type of service would not have to be a twice a year event, but a service that is readily available 365 days a year. Simply show up at the fairgrounds and the organization’s volunteers will assist you on what to do as a community volunteer. Strong reminder: Bring a good pair of walking shoes! You will be walking a lot! (During my first event, I walked 6 ½ miles in the Anaheim Convention Center).

Sincerely and Fraternally,

David Patterson, PM
Peninsula Masonic Lodge #168

From The West

To all Brethren and our Masonic Family,

“The Apron is an emblem of innocence and the badge if a Mason”. In these few words Freemasonry expresses the honor the apron symbolizes within our Ancient Craft.

The Apron is a very old symbol, older than a garment to protect your clothing or provide a place to hold tools. In ancient times, aprons were part of the clothing of the
priests of Israel. And candidates for the mysteries of Mithras in Persia were invested with aprons and the ancient Japanese used aprons in their religious worship.

Also, as we know words change in meaning with the years, for example the word “profane” which Masons use in its ancient sense, meaning “one not initiated” or “one outside the Temple”. Today profane means blasphemous. Then the ancient word “Innocence” meant “to do no harm or hurt” and today it means lack of worldly knowledge.

We are told that the apron is an emblem of innocence in a color and made of a material that are all symbolic and meaningful to a Mason.

Therefore it’s our duty to strive to wear our aprons with the best intent; “he who has worn the lambskin apron during his manhood with pleasure to himself and honor to the Fraternity.”

Fraternally,
Dennis Mahoney PM

From The South

Brethren,

It’s February and we are getting ready to celebrate Valentine’s Day with our annual Sweethearts Dinner on the 12th.

March is the month to celebrate our youth orders. It has been a tradition in our Lodge over the last years to do that with a Family Dinner in March, to raise funds for the Rainbow Girls to attend their Grand Assembly April. This year we are also adding Job’s Daughters and DeMolay boys and will support all three organizations with proceeds from the dinner.

To stay true to our traditions, we once again will serve the proper and popular St. Patrick Day’s dinner – corned beef and cabbage.

St. Patrick does not have the same allusive history as last month’s saint, Valentine. St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland. Born in Roman Britain in the late 4th century, he was kidnapped at
the age of 16 and taken to Ireland as a slave. He escaped but returned in about 432 to convert the Irish to Christianity. By the time of his death on March 17, 461, he had established monasteries, churches, and schools. Many legends grew up around him—for example, that he drove the snakes out of Ireland and used the shamrock to explain the Trinity. Ireland came to celebrate his day with religious services and feasts. It is now commemorated internationally and has grown to be considered the biggest celebration in the world.

Although blue was the color traditionally associated with St. Patrick, green is now commonly connected with the day. Join us to celebrate our youth orders with a great, home cooked
corned beef and cabbage dinner on March 12.

Sincerely and Fraternally,
Hjalmar Nilsen