Perhaps the strongest feature in his character was prudence, never acting until every circumstance, every consideration was maturely weighed . . .His integrity was most pure, his justice the most inflexible I have ever known, no motives of interest or consanguinity, of friendship or hated, being able to bias his decision. He was, indeed, in every sense of the words, a wise, a good, and a great
man. His temper was naturally irritable and high toned; but reflection and resolution had obtained a firm and habitual ascendency over it. If, however, it broke its bonds, he was most tremendous in his wrath.

In his expenses he was honourable, but exact; liberal in contributions to whatever promised utility; but frowning and unyielding on all visionary projects and all unworthy calls on his charity. His
heart was not warm in its affection; but he exactly calculated every man’s value, and gave him a solid esteem proportioned to it . . .

Although in the circle of friends, where he might be unreserved with safety, he took a free share in conversation, his colloquial talents were not above mediocrity, possessing neither copiousness of
ideas, nor fluency of words. In public, when called on for a sudden opinion, he was unready, short and embarrassed. Yet he wrote readily, rather diffusely, in an easy and correct style . . . .

On the whole, his character was, in its mass, perfect, in nothing bad, in a few points indifferent; and it may be truly said, that never did nature and fortune combine more perfectly to make a man
great and to place him . . . .in an everlasting remembrance.

Thomas Jefferson