I found this tale, and thought I’d share.
It was a tale of Masonic men surrounding a campfire in the Old West, at night, discussing the Fraternity and its teachings. One old man listened patiently, and finally spoke up:
‘I can tell you more about Masonry in a little example than some of the great Masonic philosophers can in books. Everybody stand up, and gather in a circle around the campfire.’
They did that.
‘Now, everybody hold hands with the man next to him.’
They did that, too.
‘Now what do you see looking ahead?’
‘The face of a Brother Mason though the flames.’
‘What do you feel in front of you?’
‘The warmth of the fire, and the comfort it brings on a cool night.’
‘What do you feel at your side?’
‘The warm hand of a Brother.’
‘OK. Now, drop the hands, and turn around.’
They did so.
‘Now what do you see, looking ahead?’
‘Complete darkness.’
‘What do you feel, looking ahead?’
‘A sense of loneliness, of being alienated.’
‘What do you feel at your side?’
‘Nothing at all.’
‘What do you feel on your backside?’
‘The warmth of the fire.’
‘So it is with Masonry,’ said the old man. ‘In Masonic gatherings, you can feel the warmth of Masonic interaction, you can see the face of a Brother through the light Masonry brings to you, and you can always feel the warm hand of a Brother. When you turn away from Masonry, and are out in the world, you see darkness, feel alienated and alone, and do not feel the warm hand of your Masonic Brother. But Masonry, and the warmth and light it brings, are just a turn away from you.’

—Unknown

Submitted by Wor. Ted Korosy, PM